Infographic: Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada

Caregiving is a fact of life and a common family experience in Canada. At some point in their lives, most family members have provided – or will provide – care to a family member or friend with a long-term health condition, disability or aging need. However, Canadians don’t share a single narrative or caregiving experience, as social, economic, cultural and environmental factors shape who is expected to provide care, what kind of care they provide and the consequences of managing caregiving in addition to paid work.

And while the gap between women and men has lessened over the past generation, caregivers have historically been disproportionately women, and this remains true today. Research also shows that on average, women in Canada devote more time to caregiving tasks than men and are more likely to experience negative consequences as a result of their caregiving.

Our new infographic Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada explores family caregiving and work in Canada with a focus on women.

Highlights include:

  • 30% of all women in Canada reported that they provided care in 2012.
  • Women aged 45 and older reported having spent an estimated 5.8 years providing care throughout their lives, compared with 3.4 years for men.
  • Women are significantly more likely than men to report having spent 20 hours or more per week providing care (17% and 11%, respectively).
  • An estimated 72% of women caregivers aged 45 to 65 in Canada are also employed.
  • Women reported experiencing a variety of employment impacts as a result of their caregiving responsibilities: 30% reported missing at least one full day of work; 6.4% retired early, quit or lost their paid job; and 4.7% turned down a job offer or promotion.
  • Estimates show that women caregivers in Canada lost an aggregated $221 million in wages annually between 2003 and 2008 due to absenteeism, reducing work hours or leaving employment entirely.
  • Among women caregivers who have access to flexible work arrangements, half (47%) feel they cannot utilize these options without it having a negative impact on their careers.

 

Download the Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada infographic from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

 

Learn more about women, family caregiving and work in Canada:

 


Published on March 28, 2017




Students and Family Finances in Canada

Family decisions surrounding post-secondary education can have a significant impact on the lives of young adults and their families. A university degree can open doors to employment and the possibility of higher earnings for younger generations, and be a step toward personal fulfillment for those who want to expand their horizons.

However, education isn’t cheap – the costs associated with post-secondary education are continually rising and often result in debt that can, in turn, close certain doors for students down the road. Families demonstrate a great deal of flexibility in managing their finances to support educational pursuits and adapt their aspirations to provide support.

To explore this aspect of family finances, the Vanier Institute of the Family has published the Students and Family Finances in Canada infographic. This resource brings together statistics and survey findings to examine families’ thoughts about post-secondary education and family finances, as well as the diverse ways they support higher learning.

  • Average annual university tuition fees for undergraduate students across Canada now stand at nearly $6,400, a 2.8% increase from the 2015–2016 academic year (nearly $24,000 for international students).
  • Graduating university students in Canada with debt report an average debt load of $27,000.
  • Nearly one-quarter of graduating university students (23%) say that debt discourages them from pursuing further education.
  • 8 in 10 surveyed parents with a child in university say they’re funding their child’s education, two-thirds of whom rely on day-to-day income to provide this funding.
  • More than 4 in 10 surveyed parents say that funding their children’s education is more important than contributing to their own retirement savings.

 

Download the Students and Family Finances in Canada infographic.


 

Suggested reading:

Family Finances: Investments in Education




Infographic: Family Diversity in Canada 2016

International Day of Families is approaching on May 15, a special day to recognize the importance of family to communities across the globe. Parents, children, grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins and the friends and neighbours we care for (and who care for us) all make unique and valuable contributions to our lives, our workplaces and our communities.

As we reflect on Canada’s 9.9 million families, one thing that’s clear is that there’s no such thing as a cookie-cutter family. Families are as diverse and unique as the people who comprise them, and they are all an essential part of Canada’s family landscape.

For this year’s International Day of Families, we’ve created an infographic providing a “snapshot” of modern families in Canada that highlights some of the many ways families are diverse:

  • 67% of families in Canada are married-couple families, 17% are living common-law, and 16% are lone-parent families – diverse family structures that continuously evolve
  • 464,000 stepfamilies live across the country, accounting for 13% of couples with children
  • 363,000 households contain three or more generations, and there are also approximately 53,000 “skip-generation” homes (children and grandparents with no middle generation present)
  • 1.4 million people in Canada report having an Aboriginal identity (61% First Nations, 32% Métis, 4.2% Inuit, 1.9% other Aboriginal identity, 0.8% more than one Aboriginal identity)
  • 360,000 couples in Canada are mixed unions,* accounting for 4.6% of all married and common-law couples
  • 65,000 same-sex couples were counted in the 2011 Census, 9.4% of whom are raising children
  • 68,000 people in Canada are in the CAF Regular Forces, half of whom have children under 18

 

As His Excellency The Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, expressed at the Families in Canada Conference 2015, “Families, no matter their background or their makeup, bring new and special patterns to our diverse Canadian tapestry.” Join us as we recognize and celebrate family diversity, from coast to coast to coast.

 

Download the Family Diversity in Canada 2016 infographic.

 


* Statistics Canada defines a mixed union as “a couple in which one spouse or partner belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not, as well as a couple in which the two spouses or partners belong to different visible minority groups.”

 

Suggested Reading

What’s in a Name? Defining Family in a Diverse Society by Alan Mirabelli

Timeline: 50 Years of Families in Canada