Facts and Stats: Multiple Births in Canada (2017 Update)

Did you know that there were approximately 12,000 multiple births in Canada every year over the past decade? Parents of multiples have unique experiences before, during and after they welcome their twins, triplets or higher order multiples into this world. With National Multiple Births Awareness Day just around the corner on May 28, we’ve updated our fact sheet on multiple births in Canada.

Download Facts and Stats: Multiple Births in Canada (2017 Update) from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

Learn more about diverse childbirth experiences in Canada with In Context: Understanding Maternity Care in Canada.

 


Published May 23, 2017.




New Resource for School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families

The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA), in partnership with the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle, have released the second in the series of awareness publications, School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families.

Canada’s military and Veteran families are highly diverse, and their unique perspectives enrich schools, communities and workplaces across the country. Within this diversity, however, there are a number of experiences shared by these families related to military life, such as high family mobility, recurring periods of separation and higher levels of risk for serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). These realities have an impact on the 462,000 children and youth growing up in military and Veteran families, most of whom attend civilian schools with peers, teachers and educational professionals, such as school counsellors, who may have little or no experience with, understanding of or training on military and Veteran life.

The Vanier Institute of the Family, CCPA, Veterans Affairs Canada, Military Family Services and other key members of the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle collaborated to publish School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families. This bilingual resource has been designed to increase military literacy((“Military literacy” refers to one’s awareness of the experiences of military and Veteran families, including (but not limited to) frequent periods of separation from family, higher family mobility and the possibility of higher risk for serving CAF members.)) in schools to foster inclusion, provide support and optimize services for children and youth growing up in military and Veteran families.

School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families answers four key questions:

  1. What is the military and Veteran lifestyle? 
     
  2. What resources are available to school counsellors to assist them in their work with children and youth of military and Veteran families?
     
  3. How can school counsellors promote mental health and advocate for students of military and Veteran families in schools?
     
  4. How can school counsellors support classroom teachers in their work with students of military and Veteran families?

“Children in military and Veteran families are diverse, resilient and strong, and they – like their families – demonstrate a high degree of adaptability,” says Vanier Institute CEO Nora Spinks. “Resources such as this can help ensure family health and well-being so that children and youth reach their full potential.”

Download School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families. Print copies are available from the CCPA, MFS or local MFRCs.

About the Working with… series

School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families is the second in the Working with… series, following the publication of Family Physicians Working with Military Families in November 2016.

About the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle

The Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle is a component of the Military and Veteran Families in Canada Initiative, a partnership between the Vanier Institute of the Family and the Canadian Armed Forces to build awareness, capacity, competency and community regarding military and Veteran families in Canada.

About the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association

The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA) is a national bilingual association of professionally trained counsellors engaged in the helping professions. CCPA’s members work in many diverse fields of education, employment and career development, social work, business, industry, mental health, public service agencies, government and private practice. CCPA develops and cultivates formal and informal relationships with similar health and mental health organizations in Canada and internationally.

For more information:

 

Published May 18, 2017




A Snapshot of Women, Work and Family in Canada

Canada is home to more than 18 million women (9.8 million of whom are mothers), many of whom fulfill multiple responsibilities at home, at work and in the community. Over many generations, women in Canada have had diverse employment experiences that continue to evolve and change. These experiences have differed significantly from those of men, and there is a great deal of diversity in the experiences among women, which are impacted by a variety of factors including (but not limited to) cultural norms and expectations, family status, disability and a variety of demographic characteristics.

To explore the diverse and evolving work and family experiences of women in Canada, the Vanier Institute of the Family has created A Snapshot of Women, Work and Family in Canada. This publication is a companion piece to our Fifty Years of Women, Work and Family in Canada timeline, providing visually engaging data about the diverse work and family experiences of women across Canada.

Highlights include:

  • The share of all core working-aged women (25 to 54 years) who are in the labour force has increased significantly across generations, from 35% in 1964 to 82% in 2016.
  • Employment rates vary among different groups of core working-aged women, including those who are recently immigrated (53%), women reporting an Aboriginal identity (67%) and those living with a disability (52% to 56%, depending on the age subgroup).
  • On average, women without children earn 12% more per hour than those with children – a wage gap sometimes referred to as the “mommy tax.”
  • Nearly one-third (32%) of women aged 25 to 44 who were employed part-time in 2016 said that they were working part-time because they were caring for children.
  • 70% of mothers with children aged 5 and under were employed in 2015, compared with only 32% in 1976.
  • In 2013, 11% of all recent mothers inside Quebec and 36% in the rest of Canada, respectively, did not receive maternity and/or parental leave benefits – a difference attributed to the various EI eligibility regimes in the provinces.
  • 72% of all surveyed mothers in Canada report being satisfied with their work–life balance, but this rate falls to 63% for those who are also caregivers.
  • 75% of working mothers with a flexible work schedule report being satisfied with their work–life balance – a rate that falls to 69% for those without flexibility.

This bilingual resource will be updated periodically as new data emerges. Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter to find out about updates, as well as other news about publications, projects and initiatives from the Vanier Institute.

Download A Snapshot of Women, Work and Family in Canada from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

Learn more about modern motherhood in Canada:

 

Published on May 9, 2017




The Story of Canada’s Ethnocultural Diversity in Numbers

Canada’s history is characterized by diversity and complexity – a social reality that predates that nation itself, and one that is continually reflected in Canada’s ongoing family diversity.

Understanding this diversity requires both research and conversation, and, since its founding, Statistics Canada has played a key role in facilitating evidence-based conversation through its world-renowned research and analysis.

As Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary, Statistics Canada is continuing this conversation with its speaker series, which brings together academics, historians, students, policy-makers, community organizations and practitioners to explore a variety of themes in the Canadian context.

On April 25, 2017, Vanier Institute CEO Nora Spinks joined the speakers for the first in this series, The Story of Canada’s Ethnocultural Diversity in Numbers, where she provided a “family lens” and discussed family diversity in Canada alongside a variety of researchers and subject matter experts:

Host

  • Anil Arora, Chief Statistician of Canada, Statistics Canada

Guest speaker

  • Peter S. Li, Ph.D., D.Litt., C.M., FRSC, Professor Emeritus, Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan

Moderator

  • Jean-Pierre Corbeil, Assistant Director, Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division, Statistics Canada

Panellists

  • Jack Jedwab, Executive Vice-President, Association for Canadian Studies and Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration
  • Ümit Kiziltan, Director General, Research and Evaluation Branch, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  • Nora Spinks, Chief Executive Officer, The Vanier Institute of the Family
  • Yoko Yoshida, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology, Dalhousie University

The Vanier Institute of the Family will continue to explore family diversity throughout Canada’s anniversary year as new Census data is released, including an addition to our Statistical Snapshots series in the fall focused on family diversity.

Learn more about family diversity in Canada:




Participants Wanted for Survey on Mobile Work

Many employees in Canada are “on the move” for work. Mobile workers may engage in long daily commutes, extended absences from home lasting weeks, months and even years, and many people travel to, from and within their jobs. These employment patterns have an impact on workers, their families, employers and the communities in which they live.

To understand this reality and how it affects households and communities, and influences and impacts Canadian prosperity, the Vanier Institute of the Family is collaborating with 40 researchers from 17 disciplines and 22 universities across Canada and around the world as part of the On the Move Partnership.

As part of this research initiative, a team of researchers is conducting a study of leading HR policies and practices used to manage mobile workers and balance concerns regarding employee productivity, family and well-being.

The On the Move Partnership is currently seeking survey participants. Do you have responsibility for mobile employees in your organization who need to spend extended time away from home to do their jobs? If so, your participation is invited.

There are two ways to take part:

  1. A confidential telephone interview (which will take less than one hour to complete). Please contact Kara Arnold arnoldk@mun.ca for this option.
     
  2. An anonymous online survey taking approximately 45–60 minutes to complete.

On the Move will create a report and a free webinar on the survey findings. Participants will have access to these resources as benchmarks for participating organizations as well as a source of ideas about what policies and practices work for these employees and their organizations. Participants can also enter a draw for a free registration to an online HR Social Media seminar.

Please email Kara Arnold for more information: arnoldk@mun.ca.

To learn more about the On the Move Partnership, visit the project page, or read the following resources:

 


The proposal for this research has been reviewed by the Interdisciplinary Committee on Ethics in Human Research and found to be in compliance with Memorial University’s ethics policy. If you have ethical concerns about the research, such as the way you have been treated or your rights as a participant, you may contact the Chairperson of the ICEHR at icehr@mun.ca or by telephone at 709-864-2861.




Infographic: Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada

Caregiving is a fact of life and a common family experience in Canada. At some point in their lives, most family members have provided – or will provide – care to a family member or friend with a long-term health condition, disability or aging need. However, Canadians don’t share a single narrative or caregiving experience, as social, economic, cultural and environmental factors shape who is expected to provide care, what kind of care they provide and the consequences of managing caregiving in addition to paid work.

And while the gap between women and men has lessened over the past generation, caregivers have historically been disproportionately women, and this remains true today. Research also shows that on average, women in Canada devote more time to caregiving tasks than men and are more likely to experience negative consequences as a result of their caregiving.

Our new infographic Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada explores family caregiving and work in Canada with a focus on women.

Highlights include:

  • 30% of all women in Canada reported that they provided care in 2012.
  • Women aged 45 and older reported having spent an estimated 5.8 years providing care throughout their lives, compared with 3.4 years for men.
  • Women are significantly more likely than men to report having spent 20 hours or more per week providing care (17% and 11%, respectively).
  • An estimated 72% of women caregivers aged 45 to 65 in Canada are also employed.
  • Women reported experiencing a variety of employment impacts as a result of their caregiving responsibilities: 30% reported missing at least one full day of work; 6.4% retired early, quit or lost their paid job; and 4.7% turned down a job offer or promotion.
  • Estimates show that women caregivers in Canada lost an aggregated $221 million in wages annually between 2003 and 2008 due to absenteeism, reducing work hours or leaving employment entirely.
  • Among women caregivers who have access to flexible work arrangements, half (47%) feel they cannot utilize these options without it having a negative impact on their careers.

 

Download the Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada infographic from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

 

Learn more about women, family caregiving and work in Canada:

 


Published on March 28, 2017




Vanier Institute and CHRC Host Roundtable on Workplace Diversity and Human Rights

On February 28, 2017, the Vanier Institute of the Family and the Canadian Human Rights Commission partnered to host the Canadian Work–Life Leadership Circle Roundtable on Workplace Diversity and Human Rights. This collaboration brought together Canadian leaders with an interest or involvement in work–life issues to enhance the ongoing conversation on work, life and family in Canada.

The roundtable included the following catalytic presentations and discussions:

  • Human Rights Perspectives and Workplace Impacts: The intersection of workplace policy and human rights moving forward (Marie-Claude Landry, Ad.E., Chief Commissioner, Canadian Human Rights Commission)
  • Diversity, Inclusion and Human Rights in the Workplace: The diversity of families and employees and their impact on workplace policy (Nicole Nussbaum, Staff Lawyer, Legal Aid Ontario)
  • Leading and Promising Practices: Workplace policy and practice, such as the duty to accommodate on the basis of family status, right to request flex and extending family-related leaves

“The concept of family is evolving every day, our workplaces should too,” said Marie-Claude Landry, Lawyer Emeritus (Ad.E.), member of the Bar and Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission. “Workplace accommodation is about working differently, not less. Supporting employees to meet their family obligations means that everyone wins.”

“Human rights legislation, family law, labour law, employment law and immigration law all impact families and aren’t always in alignment,” said Vanier Institute of the Family CEO Nora Spinks. “The complexity and diversity of families is being taken into consideration with informal and formal workplace accommodations in order for employees to fulfill their multiple responsibilities at work and at home.”

 

Learn about work–life and work–family issues, and diversity in Canada with the following Vanier Institute resources:

 


Published on March 2, 2017




A Snapshot of Family Caregiving and Work in Canada

At some point in our lives, there is a high likelihood that each of us will provide care to someone we know – and receive care ourselves. Family members are typically the first to step up to provide, manage and sometimes pay for this care.

Families are highly adaptable and most of the time people find ways to manage their multiple work and family responsibilities, obligations and commitments. However, juggling work and care can sometimes involve a great deal of time, energy and financial resources, and employers can play an important role in facilitating this care through accommodation, innovation and flexibility.

In A Snapshot of Family Caregiving and Work in Canada, we explore some of the family realities and trends that shape the “landscape of care” across the country. This resource highlights how our family, care and work responsibilities intersect, interact and have an impact on each other.

Highlights include:

  • 28% of Canadians (8.1M) report having provided care to a family member or friend with a long-term health condition, disability or aging need in the past year.
  • Three-quarters of family caregivers (6.1M) were employed at the time, accounting for 35% of ALL employed Canadians.
  • Most (83%) surveyed caregivers say their experience was positive, and 95% say they are effectively coping with their caregiving responsibilities.
  • 44% of employed caregivers report having missed an average 8–9 days of work in the past 12 months because of their care responsibilities.
  • More than one-third of young carers (36%) arrived to work late, left early or took time off due to their caregiving responsibilities.
  • Employers across Canada lose an estimated $5.5 billion annually in lost productivity due to caregiving-related absenteeism.
  • Research shows that caregiving provides a variety of benefits to caregivers, including a sense of personal growth, increased meaning and purpose, strengthened family relationships, increased empathy and skill development.

 

Reconciling care and work requires understanding, respect and recognition from employers that sometimes an employee’s family circumstances need focused attention. Research shows that family caregivers and their employers benefit from policies that are inclusive, flexible and responsive, and when employees have a clear understanding of the process for handling individual requests for accommodation and customizing work arrangements.

For nearly all Canadians, caregiving is inevitable at some point over the course of their lives. Care is not always predictable and does not always arise outside working hours. Open communication and creative approaches to harmonizing work and care in a flexible manner benefits employees, employers, the economy and society.

Download A Snapshot of Family Caregiving and Work in Canada from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

 

Learn more about family caregiving and work in Canada:

 


Published on February 21, 2017




Leaders meet to share progress on developing military literacy in Canada

(Ottawa, ON, January 24, 2017) Her Excellency Sharon Johnston, C.C., joined representatives of the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle yesterday, engaging with members to create resources to develop military literacy among professional associations and community organizations that will have a positive impact on the military and Veteran family experience.

Her Excellency highlighted the work being done to create a circle of support for military and Veteran families. “As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Leadership Circle illustrates the power of collaboration and community engagement across the country for the benefit of military and Veteran families,” she said.

Canada is home to 40,000 Regular Force military families, 14,000 Reserve Force families and more than 600,000 Veterans. They access a variety of programs and services in their neighbourhoods, including child care and eldercare, health and mental health, education, employment and transition support. Community programs are more inclusive and welcoming of military and Veteran families when professionals and practitioners have a high degree of military literacy – awareness of their experiences and unique “military life stressors” (i.e. high mobility, separation and risk). The Leadership Circle facilitates innovative partnerships and collaborations based on building military literacy.

Statistics on Military and Veteran families in Canada:

  • In the mid-1990s, 80% of military families in Canada lived ON a base – today, 85% live OFF-base
  • 49% of serving CAF members and 37% of Veterans have children under 18
  • The majority (54%) of surveyed children in military families say they feel pride in their deployed parent
  • 87% of surveyed CAF partners say they are able to cope emotionally with their partner’s absence during deployment
  • 3 in 10 surveyed CAF partners spouses say their career has NOT been affected by their partner’s military service
  • 8% of Veterans report living with low income, compared with 15% of Canadians

“The military lifestyle is unique and full of adventure. The effectiveness and well-being of our military members is underpinned by their strong, resilient, and proud military families who remain that way due to the programs and services delivered by the types of organizations represented in the Leadership Circle,” said Major General Wayne Eyre, Deputy Commander Military Personnel Command.

“Canadian military and Veteran families can thrive if they have access to appropriate care and support. Since military families move so frequently, they often face special challenges like finding a family doctor or continuing educational progress for their children when they relocate to a new community, or a new province,” said Colonel Dan Harris, Director, Military Family Services and Co-Chair, Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle. “Military Family Services, as a co-founder of the Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle, is happy to collaborate with our many committed partners to enhance military literacy among associations and organizations in Canada.”

“The true value of the Leadership Circle is fully realized as committed members continue to work together to produce useful resources, develop innovative programs and establish strong relationships,” added Nora Spinks, CEO of the Vanier Institute of the Family and Co-Chair of the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle.

“When a man or woman serves in the Canadian Armed Forces, the entire family serves with them.  Sharing innovative ideas is key; and providing reliable information for professionals and community practitioners about the unique lifestyle of military and Veteran families is vital to building awareness,” said Karen McCrimmon, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence, who also attended the event.  “Veterans Affairs Canada is proud to be working with so many committed organizations to enhance understanding, access, resources and care for Veteran families.”

The Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle is a collaboration between organizations and leaders from across the country that is building awareness, capacity, competency and community in support of military and Veteran families. This growing initiative is currently comprised of more than 60 individuals from over 50 organizations, including 38 member organizations, who are working with and for military and Veteran families in Canada.

 


Learn about the Leadership Circle Hubs.

Watch the video message to Leadership Circle members and participants from Hon. Kent Hehr, Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence.

Learn about military and Veteran families in Canada with A Snapshot of Military and Veteran Families in Canada.

Watch the CFPC video about ensuring equitable access to quality health care for military families.




Dr. Heidi Cramm receives Colonel Russell Mann Military Family Health Research Award

Congratulations to Dr. Heidi Cramm, recipient of the 2016 Colonel Russell Mann Military Family Health Research Award!

Each year, the Vanier Institute of the Family recognizes high-quality Canadian research that increases our understanding of military and Veteran family health with the Colonel Russell Mann Military Family Health Research Award, delivered annually at Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research (CIMVHR) Forum events.

Dr. Cramm was recognized at Forum 2016 as the lead author of the study Navigating Healthcare Systems for Military-connected Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Qualitative Study of Military Families Experiencing Mandatory Relocation. Dr. Cramm and her research team conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with military families and found that they experience challenges and burdens when tasked with system navigation for children who have autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study recommends enhanced coordination of services and communication across interjurisdictional providers, along with health care system literacy and advocacy strategies for families.

 


Published on November 28, 2016