Congratulations to Canada’s Next Governor General

On behalf of the Vanier Institute of the Family, CEO Nora Spinks extends congratulations to Ms. Julie Payette on her appointment as the 29th Governor General of Canada. Her esteemed career and history of accomplishment serve as an inspiration to Canadians of all ages and backgrounds, and we look forward to her leadership as Canada moves beyond its 150th anniversary into a bright future.

Founded in 1965 by His Excellency General The Right Honourable Georges P. Vanier and Madame Pauline Vanier, the Vanier Institute of the Family is a national, independent, charitable organization dedicated to understanding the diversity and complexity of families and the reality of family life in Canada. In our work to realize the Vaniers’ vision, we offer access to a range of publications, research initiatives, presentations and social media content to enhance the national understanding of how families interact with, have an impact on and are affected by social, economic, environmental and cultural forces.

Throughout their tenure, we have worked closely with Their Excellencies, The Right Honourable David Johnston and Mrs. Sharon Johnston in a variety of settings to facilitate the work of those who study, serve and support Canada’s diverse families. We look forward to continuing our long-standing relationship between the Vanier Institute and the Office of the Governor General.

 


Published on July 14, 2017




Vanier Institute Update: June 2017

What’s New 

 

 What We’re Reading

 

What’s in the Media 

 

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Exploring Families with Statistics Canada and the Vanier Institute

In their most recent blog post, Statistics Canada discusses the Vanier Institute’s approach to exploring families and family experiences, as well as its role in enhancing the national understanding of families in Canada.

“Statistics Canada data are vital to what we do and to all of the people and organizations that want, and are involved with, evidence-based decision making,” said Spinks. “At the Vanier Institute, we look deeper to find the stories these numbers are telling us, and to ultimately make a difference in the lives of Canadians from coast to coast to coast.”

– Vanier Institute CEO Nora Spinks

Read more by visiting the Statistics Canada blog post, Learning about Canada’s diverse families through Nora Spinks from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

 


Posted on June 23, 2017




Facts and Stats: Indigenous Families in Canada

Did you know that there are more than 1.4 million Indigenous people living in Canada, nearly 3 in 10 of whom are children? Did you know that despite accounting for only 7% of all children across the country, Indigenous children and youth represent half of all foster children?

Indigenous families in Canada are highly diverse and, like all families, they adapt and react to evolving social, economic, cultural and environmental contexts. Our newest “Facts and Stats” publication compiles data from Statistics Canada to explore some of the family realities of Indigenous people in Canada.

Download Facts and Stats: Indigenous Families in Canada from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

 


Published on June 20, 2017




A Snapshot of Men, Work and Family Relationships in Canada

Over the past half-century, fatherhood in Canada has evolved dramatically  as men across the country adapt and react to social, economic, cultural and environmental contexts. Throughout this period, men have had diverse employment experiences as they manage their multiple roles inside and outside the family home. These experiences have been impacted by a variety of factors, including (but not limited to) cultural norms and expectations, family status, disability and a variety of demographic characteristics, as well as women’s increased involvement in the paid labour force.

While many fathers in previous generations acted exclusively as “traditional” breadwinning father figures, modern fathers are increasingly likely to embrace caring roles and assume more household management responsibilities. In doing so, dads across Canada are renegotiating and reshaping the relationship between fatherhood and work.

Highlights include:

  • Men are less likely than in previous generations to fulfill a breadwinner role exclusively. In 2014, 79% of single-earner couple families with children included a breadwinning father, down from 96% in 1976.
  • Men account for a growing share of part-time workers. One-quarter (25%) of Canadians aged 25 to 54 who worked part-time in 2016 were men, up from 15% in 1986.
  • The proportion of never-married men is on the rise. In 2011, more than half (54%) of men in Canada aged 30 to 34 report never having been married, up from 15% in 1981.
  • Canada is home to many caregiving men. In 2012, nearly half (46%) of all caregivers in Canada were men, 11% of whom provided 20 or more hours per week of care.
  • Many men want to be stay-at-home parents. Nearly four in 10 (39%) surveyed men say they would prefer to be a stay-at-home parent.
  • Many men engage in household work and related activities. Nearly half (45%) of surveyed fathers in North America say they’re the “primary grocery shopper” in their household.
  • Flex at work can facilitate work–life balance. More than eight in 10 (81%) full-time working fathers who have a flexible schedule say they’re satisfied with their work–life balance, compared with 76% for those without flex.

 

This bilingual resource will be updated periodically as new data emerges. Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter to find out about updates, as well as other news about publications, projects and initiatives from the Vanier Institute.

Download A Snapshot of Men, Work and Family Relationships in Canada from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

 

Learn more about men, work and family relationships in Canada:

 


Published on June 13, 2017




A Snapshot of Population Aging and Intergenerational Relationships in Canada

Canada’s population is aging rapidly, with a higher share of seniors than ever before. While this can present some societal challenges, it also provides growing opportunities for intergenerational relationships, since younger people have a greater likelihood of having more seniors and elders in their lives. Population aging has an impact not only on family relationships, but also on the social, economic, cultural and environmental contexts in which families live.

Using new statistics from the 2016 Census, A Snapshot of Population Aging and Intergenerational Relationships in Canada explores the evolving demographic landscape across the country through a family lens. As the data shows, Canadians are getting older, and “seniorhood” is a growing life stage – a time when many of our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents are continuing to play important roles in our families, workplaces and communities.

Highlights include:

  • There are more seniors than ever before in Canada. More than 5.9 million people in Canada are aged 65 and older – up 20% since 2011 and now outnumbering children (5.8 million).
  • Nunavut is the youngest region in Canada. Children account for one-third (33%) of the population in Nunavut.
  • We’re more likely to become seniors than in the past. In 2012, nine in 10 Canadians were expected to reach age 65, up from six in 10 in 1925.
  • The number of multi-generational households is growing. In 2011, 1.3 million people in Canada lived in multi-generational homes, up 40% since 2001.
  • Working seniors are on the rise. The labour market participation rate of seniors more than doubled since 2000, from 6.0% to 14% in 2016.
  • Canada’s aging population affects family finances. An estimated $750 billion is expected to be transferred to Canadians aged 50 to 75 over the next decade.

 

This bilingual resource will be updated periodically as new data emerges. Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter to find out about updates, as well as other news about publications, projects and initiatives from the Vanier Institute.

Download A Snapshot of Population Aging and Intergenerational Relationships in Canada from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

Learn more about population aging and seniors in Canada:

 


Published on May 31, 2017




Vanier Institute Update: May 2017

What’s New

 

 What We’re Reading

 

What’s in the Media 

 

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Facts and Stats: Multiple Births in Canada (2017 Update)

Did you know that there were approximately 12,000 multiple births in Canada every year over the past decade? Parents of multiples have unique experiences before, during and after they welcome their twins, triplets or higher order multiples into this world. With National Multiple Births Awareness Day just around the corner on May 28, we’ve updated our fact sheet on multiple births in Canada.

Download Facts and Stats: Multiple Births in Canada (2017 Update) from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

Learn more about diverse childbirth experiences in Canada with In Context: Understanding Maternity Care in Canada.

 


Published May 23, 2017.




New Resource for School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families

The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA), in partnership with the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle, have released the second in the series of awareness publications, School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families.

Canada’s military and Veteran families are highly diverse, and their unique perspectives enrich schools, communities and workplaces across the country. Within this diversity, however, there are a number of experiences shared by these families related to military life, such as high family mobility, recurring periods of separation and higher levels of risk for serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). These realities have an impact on the 462,000 children and youth growing up in military and Veteran families, most of whom attend civilian schools with peers, teachers and educational professionals, such as school counsellors, who may have little or no experience with, understanding of or training on military and Veteran life.

The Vanier Institute of the Family, CCPA, Veterans Affairs Canada, Military Family Services and other key members of the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle collaborated to publish School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families. This bilingual resource has been designed to increase military literacy((“Military literacy” refers to one’s awareness of the experiences of military and Veteran families, including (but not limited to) frequent periods of separation from family, higher family mobility and the possibility of higher risk for serving CAF members.)) in schools to foster inclusion, provide support and optimize services for children and youth growing up in military and Veteran families.

School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families answers four key questions:

  1. What is the military and Veteran lifestyle? 
     
  2. What resources are available to school counsellors to assist them in their work with children and youth of military and Veteran families?
     
  3. How can school counsellors promote mental health and advocate for students of military and Veteran families in schools?
     
  4. How can school counsellors support classroom teachers in their work with students of military and Veteran families?

“Children in military and Veteran families are diverse, resilient and strong, and they – like their families – demonstrate a high degree of adaptability,” says Vanier Institute CEO Nora Spinks. “Resources such as this can help ensure family health and well-being so that children and youth reach their full potential.”

Download School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families. Print copies are available from the CCPA, MFS or local MFRCs.

About the Working with… series

School Counsellors Working with Military and Veteran Families is the second in the Working with… series, following the publication of Family Physicians Working with Military Families in November 2016.

About the Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle

The Canadian Military and Veteran Families Leadership Circle is a component of the Military and Veteran Families in Canada Initiative, a partnership between the Vanier Institute of the Family and the Canadian Armed Forces to build awareness, capacity, competency and community regarding military and Veteran families in Canada.

About the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association

The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA) is a national bilingual association of professionally trained counsellors engaged in the helping professions. CCPA’s members work in many diverse fields of education, employment and career development, social work, business, industry, mental health, public service agencies, government and private practice. CCPA develops and cultivates formal and informal relationships with similar health and mental health organizations in Canada and internationally.

For more information:

 

Published May 18, 2017




A Snapshot of Women, Work and Family in Canada

Canada is home to more than 18 million women (9.8 million of whom are mothers), many of whom fulfill multiple responsibilities at home, at work and in the community. Over many generations, women in Canada have had diverse employment experiences that continue to evolve and change. These experiences have differed significantly from those of men, and there is a great deal of diversity in the experiences among women, which are impacted by a variety of factors including (but not limited to) cultural norms and expectations, family status, disability and a variety of demographic characteristics.

To explore the diverse and evolving work and family experiences of women in Canada, the Vanier Institute of the Family has created A Snapshot of Women, Work and Family in Canada. This publication is a companion piece to our Fifty Years of Women, Work and Family in Canada timeline, providing visually engaging data about the diverse work and family experiences of women across Canada.

Highlights include:

  • The share of all core working-aged women (25 to 54 years) who are in the labour force has increased significantly across generations, from 35% in 1964 to 82% in 2016.
  • Employment rates vary among different groups of core working-aged women, including those who are recently immigrated (53%), women reporting an Aboriginal identity (67%) and those living with a disability (52% to 56%, depending on the age subgroup).
  • On average, women without children earn 12% more per hour than those with children – a wage gap sometimes referred to as the “mommy tax.”
  • Nearly one-third (32%) of women aged 25 to 44 who were employed part-time in 2016 said that they were working part-time because they were caring for children.
  • 70% of mothers with children aged 5 and under were employed in 2015, compared with only 32% in 1976.
  • In 2013, 11% of all recent mothers inside Quebec and 36% in the rest of Canada, respectively, did not receive maternity and/or parental leave benefits – a difference attributed to the various EI eligibility regimes in the provinces.
  • 72% of all surveyed mothers in Canada report being satisfied with their work–life balance, but this rate falls to 63% for those who are also caregivers.
  • 75% of working mothers with a flexible work schedule report being satisfied with their work–life balance – a rate that falls to 69% for those without flexibility.

This bilingual resource will be updated periodically as new data emerges. Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter to find out about updates, as well as other news about publications, projects and initiatives from the Vanier Institute.

Download A Snapshot of Women, Work and Family in Canada from the Vanier Institute of the Family.

Learn more about modern motherhood in Canada:

 


Published on May 9, 2017